traveling to Uzbekistan

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Interesting websites about traveling to Uzbekistan

1. UZBEKISTAN – TOP 10 PLACES TO VISIT

Uzbekistan is one of the fascinating countries in Central Asia and famous for its Silk Road cities of Samarkand and Bukhara. Twice the size of the UK, it has a rich cultural heritage and a long history steeped in tradition. You won’t be surprised to learn that it is home to four significant UNESCO World Heritage sites and six UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage listings. Another thirty are waiting in the wings on the Tentative List. From such a rich list of important places to visit, things to do and an enormous variety of sightseeing tours on offer, we present you with our pick of Uzbekistan Travel – Top 10 Places to Visit:

#1 SAMARKAND
“Samarkand – Crossroad of Cultures” is the official moniker used to describe this city as a UNESCO World Heritage site. Samarkand conjures up images of ancient times and sounds almost mythical. However, this is no fairytale: Samarkand today is a lively city which cherishes its traditions. Archaeological excavations have revealed a history which dates back 3500 years; the town of Afrosiab was founded in the 7th century BC. The area was continuously inhabited and served as a melting pot of diverse cultures. It was conquered by Alexander the Great and Genghis Khan, was the sumptuous capital of the Timurid Empire and played an important role in the development of Islamic architecture and arts. You won’t want to miss Registan square, the Bibi Khanum and Gur Emir Mausoleums, the Shah-i-Zinda complex, Afrosiab & the Ulughbek Observatory.

#2 BUKHARA
The historic center of Bukhara has been an important base for Islamic theology and science for several centuries. Its well-preserved city center was recognized by UNESCO as an exemplary medieval city. City planning, urban, economic and scientific development in Bukhara had a large impact on the Islamic World in the Middle Ages. The earliest architectural monument is the tomb of Ismail Somoni dating back to the 10th century. For seven centuries up until the 16th century, it was the largest Islamic center for the study of Sufism with hundreds of mosques and madrasas or learning places. World-renowned scholar Avicenna was born near Bukhara and grew up there. While in Bukhara we’d recommend taking a stroll around the old city to savor its architectural legacy and imagine yourself bargaining as they would have done in medieval times.

#3 KHIVA

The first UNESCO World Heritage site in Uzbekistan was inscribed in 1990 noting its importance in the exceptional heritage of ancient Silk Road traditions. Itchan Kala, which literally translates as the inner part of the old city, is surrounded by thick mud walls. It contains 51 monuments and is although around 250 households still make their home inside, it feels more like an open-air museum. Looking down from Islam Khoja minaret or the city walls, it’s hard to imagine this is the 21st century. It is here in Khiva that the scholar AI-Khoresmi, the father of algebra, was born and introduced algorithms to the world. Take a guided tour to get to know the stories that feature in the history of this fascinating city.

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2. 40 Incredible Photos Of Uzbekistan That Will Blow Your Mind

In 2015 we travelled across Central Asia, spending four months exploring the ‘Stans – Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan.

From the Pamir Mountains to the Karakum Desert and everywhere in between, the thing that blew us away the most was getting lost along the historic Silk Road.

Each country is uniquely different, and it is a tough call comparing one with the other. But in terms of awe-inspiring history and phenomenal architecture, only one nation stands out – Uzbekistan.

Sure, we could write a 5000-word article on why it was so mesmerising. Or we could just put together 40 of our favourite photos to convince you to go yourself. We went with the latter option.

So here you go – 40 incredible photos of Uzbekistan that will blow your mind!

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3.  Uzbekistan Travel Safety Tips

This beautiful, historic Central Asian country has a lot to recommend it, for the travel aware.

Throughout history Uzbekistan has been part of the ancient trading route from Asia to Europe, but travelling along the Silk Road these days isn’t quite as romantic, wild and adventurous as it once was. Well, it’s still wild but not in a good way!

Border Issues
Uzbekistan is a land locked country and most of its border areas are not safe. It should come as no surprise with the areas bordering Afghanistan, but you should also exercise caution in areas bordering Tajikistan, Tajik, Kyrgyz and Kyrgyzstan. These areas may be land-mined and there have been cross border gunfire plus they are subject to closure without notice. Problematically, many border areas are not well marked so you should only cross at authorized border crossing points.

There have also been incidents of inter-ethnic violence in the Provinces of Osh and Jalal-Abad in Kyrgystann and also the Fergana Valley, so it’s best to avoid these areas.

You should also ensure that your visa’s and travel permits are in place, often you will have to cross borders out of Uzbekistan to get to another part of the country. Also if you are trying to get to Termez and other areas of the Surkhandarya region you will need a permit from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Tashkent which takes about five days to process.

From January 2017 the citizens of 15 countries — including some EU countries, the UK, and Australia — will be able to obtain a via-on-arrival.

Cash, Lots of Cash
Cash is King in Uzbekistan. If you ever want to feel like you are literally swimming in money Uzbekistan is the place to go.

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4.  10 Top places to visit in Tashkent

Overlooked by most travelers in favor of the stunning Silk Road cities of Samarkand, Bukhara, and Khiva, Tashkent, the capital of Uzbekistan, is a city filled with Islamic and Soviet architecture, home to more than 4 million people, making it the largest city in Central Asia.

With extremely wide avenues and plenty of modern restaurants and posh buildings, the surprisingly clean and fancy Tashkent is, definitely, quite different from the idea you have of a Central Asian city.

Tashkent is the cultural and economic center of Uzbekistan and one of the wealthiest cities in Central Asia.

For some reason, many people believe that Tashkent is a pretty new city but, in fact, its history dates back to the 4th century B.C., as suggested by the evidence found at the ruins of Kanka, an archaeological site located 80km from Tashkent. Furthermore, Tashkent has been an important place in the region for millennia, benefiting from its highly strategic location, on the way to Bukhara, Samarkand, and China. For this reason, over the years, the capital of Uzbekistan has been targeted, sacked and invaded by many groups and civilizations, including the Russian Tsars and, of course, the Soviet Union.

Spare a couple of days to pay Tashkent the visit it deserves and I am pretty sure that it won’t disappoint you. Here’s a list of the top places to visit in Tashkent plus a couple of accommodation suggestions and transportation tips.

Chorsu Bazar
If you have just arrived in Central Asia for the first time, you should go straight to Chorsu Bazar, one of the most important markets in Central Asia and a fascinating place to get a vague feeling of what the ancient Silk Road trade used to be. The market has been going for centuries, but it was the Soviets who constructed and covered it with the blue-domed building. All the locals come to the bazaar, which means that this is also a great place to observe the ethnic and cultural blend Tashkent is famous for.

From all kinds of fruit and meat to underwear and handicrafts, here you can find absolutely anything you want. I strongly recommend you buy kurut, a Central Asian snack which consists of dried cheese balls. They are eaten all across the region but, here, you will find one hundred types of kurut, filled with all kinds of herbs and other ingredients. Chorsu Bazar is one of the best things to do in Tashkent.

Hotel Uzbekistan
One of the things I love the most about traveling to ex-Soviet countries is visiting Soviet buildings. They are massive, old-fashioned and made of concrete. In Tashkent, my favorite Soviet building would be, definitely, Hotel Uzbekistan, whose size won’t leave you indifferent. I believe that each window must be a room. Can you get an idea of its dimensions?

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5. The Top 13 Places To Visit in Uzbekistan

Uzbekistan may not be at the top of most people’s travel lists. However, the fascinating Central Asian country has a lot to offer. There are many places to visit in Uzbekistan. From its Silk Road cities of Samarkand and Bukhara to the many palaces and museums, it is home to four significant UNESCO World Heritage sites you cannot miss.

With such a rich cultural heritage and so many amazing places to visit in Uzbekistan, it should definitely be on your list of potential holiday destinations. And, to make things easier, Uzbekistan also recently announced a new e-visa system which promises to make it much easier to visit.

1.Registan Square, Samarkand

Samarkand’s Registan Square was once called one of the most beautiful squares in the world, and it’s easy to see why. This public square was the heart of the ancient city of Samarkand during the Timurid dynasty. It is known for its beautiful Islamic architecture and three imposing madrassas. In Tajik, Registan translates to “sandy place”.

2.Gur-e-Amir, Samarkand

The Gūr-e Amīr is the mausoleum of the 14th-century Mongol conqueror Timur. Literally translating to “Tomb of the Commander,” it has a beautiful fluted azure dome. The mausoleum is also the resting place for two of Timur’s sons and grandsons. The tomb also inspired Mughal architecture in India, especially Humayun’s Tomb and the Taj Mahal.
3.Amir Timur Museum, Tashkent

The Amir Timur Museum in Tashkent is dedicated to the Mongol conqueror, Timur. It was opened in the capital, Tashkent, in 1996 after the country gained independence. The museum has over 5,000 exhibits artefacts related to Timur and the dynasty that followed him, the Timurid Dynasty. The building itself is meant to resemble the Gur-e Amir mausoleum in Samarkand.

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